TwitterUnTagTutorial_01

An edited screenshot of a browser Twitter exchange between two users. Includes two tweets.
A very important conversation.

An edited screenshot of a browser Twitter exchange between two users. Includes two tweets.

The background of the entire image is dark blue. Select interface highlights are magenta.

The top of the image includes information about the person who wrote the first tweet. It includes the user’s avatar, which is an image of a light-skinned person with reddish hair, looking at the audience.

To the right of the avatar is the user’s display name in a white sans-serif typeface. The text is: “Elizabeth Roderick”. After this, on the same line in a light grey sans-serif typeface, is the user’s username. The text is: “@LidsRodney”.

This is followed by the body of the tweet, which has been edited. The typeface of the edited text is white sans-serif. It is a different font from the unedited user interface.

The text is:

“Hey, Eb, how about you replace what I actually said with this much less interesting text because you want to show people how to untag Twitter users from conversations?”

Underneath the text of the first tweet are icons indicating interaction options, the first three and fifth in light grey. These are: Reply, Retweet, Buffer, Like, and Direct Message. The reply icon is followed by the number 1, indicating there has been one reply. The Like heart icon is red and followed by the number 1. The red heart indicates the account of the user taking the screenshots has liked the tweet. The number 1 indicates that the tweet has been liked by one account.

Below this is the second tweet.

The top of the second tweet includes information about the person who wrote the tweet. It includes the user’s avatar, which is an image of a light-skinned person with black hair and their hands in their hair. The person’s mouth is open. They look exasperated.

To the right of the avatar is the user’s display name in a white sans-serif typeface. The text is: “Eb Hates The Whole Month Of April”. Beneath this, in a light grey sans-serif typeface, is the user’s username. The text is: “@EbThen”.

The next line indicates the account to which the user is replying with this tweet. The body of the text is the same light grey sans-serif typeface as previous. The username of the account is in the previously mentioned magenta typeface. The text is: “Replying to @LidsRodney”.

This is followed by the body of the tweet, which has been edited. The typeface of the edited text is white sans-serif. It is a different font from the unedited user interface. The text “@SJwishlists” is the only unedited part of the tweet and is in the original magenta sans-serif typeface.

The text of the edited tweet is as follows:

“That is a brilliant idea, and I am so glad you had it!

“I want to mention my awesome project @SJwishlists in this not-at-all awkward and totally conversational way.

“Oh look, I have accomplished my goal.”

Below the text of the tweet is the date and time information of the original tweet. This is in a light grey sans-serif typeface. The information is: “11:56 AM – 14 Apr 2018”.

Underneath that are icons indicating interaction options, all in light grey. These are: Reply, Retweet, Buffer, Like, and Analytics.

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